Selected CFPs

This post is specifically for students in Dr. Mowry’s Milton class, but I’m sure that others will find it useful too! We often pull our CFP posts from U Penn, but graduate students especially should regularly check into this site. New submissions for conferences and journals are constantly coming in, and everything is nicely organized by subject tags. Here’s a few that may be specifically helpful for you Milton-heads:

John Milton: a special topic session at RMMLA (October 10-12, 2013)

full name / name of organization:
Clay Daniel/RMMLA
contact email:
clayldaniel@live.com; daniel@utpa.edu

Papers on any aspect of Milton, for the annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association, October 10-12, 2013, in Vancouver, Washington. Email 200-300 word proposals, for 15-20 minute presentations, by March 1, 2013, to clayldaniel@live.com or daniel@utpa.edu. All proposals are acknowledged. You do not have to be a member of RMMLA to propose a paper, but you should become a member by April 1 to be listed in the program.

cfp categories:
classical_studies
general_announcements
poetry
religion
renaissance

[UPDATE] Revelation, Revulsion, & Revolution – April 5, 2013 – April 6, 2013 (Proposal submission extended to Jan. 13th, 2013)

full name / name of organization:
AEGIS Graduate Student Organization, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
contact email:
siucaegis@gmail.com

“… Oh! I would not tell you what is behind the black veil for the world! Are not you wild to know?”
“Oh! Yes, quite; what can it be? But do not tell me — I would not be told upon any account. I know it must be a skeleton, I am sure it is Laurentina’s skeleton. Oh! I am delighted with the book! I should like to spend my whole life in reading it…”
– Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

The seventh annual AEGIS (Association of English Graduate Instructors and Students) graduate conference invites paper proposals on interdisciplinary topics in revelation, revulsion, and revolution in literature, cinema, the writing process, popular culture and art, or in creative works of short fiction and poetry that explore this theme.

The sudden discovery of the horrific often brings along with it feelings of both revulsion and attraction. Catherine yearns to know what lies beyond the veil as she reads The Mysteries of Udolpho, even though the discovery will terrify her. We, too, as readers find ourselves lusting after that which we know will shock and repulse us upon its discovery. This sense of revulsion, which can either repulse or attract, leads subsequently to revelation. Often, the sudden discovery of what should shock or harm results in fascination to the point that entire systems of thought and practice are uprooted and exchanged for something new and unorthodox. The gap between pleasure and pain is sometimes remarkably thin, and it is this narrow space that we wish to explore.

This conference will take place Friday April 5th, 2013 – Saturday, April 6th, 2013 on the campus of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, IL.

Please send paper abstracts of 250-500 words, along with a brief bio of approximately 100 words, to Jason Kirker (siucaegis@gmail.com) as an attached .doc, .docx, or .pdf file by Jan 13, 2013.

Possible paper topics include, but are not limited to:

– Cinematic and Graphic Representations of Pain as Voyeurism
– Cultural Differences in Composition and Writing Center Studies
– Disability Studies
– Globalization
– The Gothic
– The Gross or Scatological in Creative Writing
– Horror, Mystery, and Crime Novels or Films
– La Terreur, Jacobin Hysteria, and Responses to the French Revolution
– “Memento Mori” and other Social Reminders of Death
– Political Implications of Loss and the Grotesque
– Post-colonial Theory and the Abandonment of Spent Nations
– Psychological Fixation
– Trauma Studies
– Torture and Punishment

cfp categories:
african-american
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
eighteenth_century
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
graduate_conferences
interdisciplinary
medieval
popular_culture
postcolonial
renaissance
romantic
theatre
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian

Giving Voice to the Dead: Haunted Histories and Living Landscapes in Literature

full name / name of organization:
Pennsylvania College English Association
contact email:
penncea@gmail.com

March 14-16, 2013
Eisenhower Hotel & Conference Center
2634 Emmitsburg Rd, Gettysburg, PA

During three days of battle, the landscape of Gettysburg was forever altered. What was once a small town and farming community was transformed into a memorial site that would be haunted by the lives lost and changed in the war. While many of the battlefields have been preserved, the events that took place on them have inscribed deeper meanings into the landscape and left traces that resonate within the American cultural psyche as we project our national narrative onto the landscape itself. The significance of Gettysburg in the American national narrative speaks in part to a question of our relationship to landscapes, both as physical places and as mental topographies shaped by our experiences and our imaginations. This year’s theme focuses on stories of our past and present, on the way we engage with history and the landscapes we inhabit.

PCEA invites proposals for critical interpretations and original creative works that celebrate any aspect of our theme. We also welcome all proposals related to the study and/or teaching of literature, film, composition and linguistics, as well as creative work.

Proposals are due by January 30, 2013, and should include the following information:
Name
Institutional Affiliation/Position (if applicable)
Mailing Address (including zip code)
Phone number
E-mail address
Title of proposed presentation
250-500 word abstract
A/V equipment needs, if any (Note: We can provide A/V projectors, but presenters must bring their own laptops)
Special needs, if any

Submit proposals by email to the PCEA Program Chair at penncea@gmail.com.
• Presenters must join PCEA in order to participate.
• To preserve time for discussion, PCEA limits individual critical and creative presentations to 15 minutes.

Please note:
Undergraduate student participation is limited to faculty-organized and led panels. Faculty organizers should submit panel information, including contact information and abstracts to the program chair. Individual undergraduate proposals will not be accepted. Undergraduate students are welcome to attend the conference.

PCEA 2013 Graduate Student Writing Contest
Graduate students who submit an abstract for a presentation at the PCEA 2013 Conference (or who will be part of a pre-arranged panel) are also invited to compete for the PCEA Best Student Paper Awards. Awards are given in three separate categories:
• Critical Essay
• Creative Poetry
• Creative Prose
These awards carry a small monetary prize. Students who compete must be PCEA members. Award winners will also be considered for publication in PCEA’s journal, Pennsylvania English.

Contest Submission Information
To compete, submit the complete work no later than January 30, 2013 to the PCEA Program Chair at penncea@gmail.com.
• Designate “PCEA Contest Entry” in the subject line of the email
• Include the title of the work and the author’s name in the email message.
• Remove the author’s name from the work itself.
• Submit papers as MS Word documents attached to email.

Submissions of critical work should be the equivalent of a conference paper, including notes and works cited (max. 12 pages), and follow MLA format for documentation and citation. For creative work, submit 8-12 pages of double-spaced prose (fiction or creative non-fiction) or 4-6 poems. No mixed genre submissions, please. Contest entrants must present their papers at the conference to receive prizes.

Critical or creative entries that do not follow submission guidelines and those that are received after the deadline will not be considered.

cfp categories:
african-american
american
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
eighteenth_century
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
medieval
modernist studies
poetry
postcolonial
renaissance
rhetoric_and_composition
romantic
travel_writing
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian

Crossing the Boundaries 2013: Dis/Place

full name / name of organization:
Art History Department, Binghamton University
contact email:
buctb2013@gmail.com

April 26-27th, 2013
Binghamton University
A multidisciplinary, multivocal academic conference with a global geographic and broad temporal reach, presented by the Art History Graduate Student Union

Keynote Speaker:
Ariella Azoulay, Brown University
——————-

http://ctbconf.wordpress.com

DIS/PLACE: To remove or shift from its place; to put out of the proper or usual place; to remove from a position, dignity, or office; to remove, banish; to oust (something) from its place and occupy it instead; to take the place of, supplant, ‘replace.’

The Art History Graduate Student Union at Binghamton University invites submissions from any historical or disciplinary approach that consider the subject of the placement and/or displacement (of knowledge, people, groups, and objects) for the 21st Annual Crossing the Boundaries Conference. Propelled by a longstanding commitment to bring forth exceptional critical research, this year’s conference aims to investigate shifts and transformations in global societies, while aspiring to position them in a historical perspective. Specifically, we aim to consider how technologies, migration, archiving and visibility are not only utilized by and incorporated into apparatuses of power, but also how they have been (re)presented, understood and conceptualized from pre-modern eras to the present day. Current civic and international disputes warrant an investigation of historical gatherings, modes of circulation and dissemination vis-à-vis the politics and mechanism of the visual (whether of the photographic image, technologies of surveillance, portraiture and so forth) and their possible appropriation into practices of governance.

Potential topics might include (but are not limited to):

Production of visual knowledge and meaning
Civil history of zones of conflict and their presentation in media
Revolutions and visual media
Archiving machineries and procedures
Photographic and visual technologies of surveillance
Political economies
Mechanisms of visual representations
Cultural traditions and historical change
Migration of knowledge and peoples
Discourses of identities and differences
Museum practices and recontextualization
Consumption and dissemination of representations
Political positions and their emergence in art
Cultural exchange
Representations of social and political memory

The wide scope of this theme reflects our interest in creating a multi-disciplinary, geographically and historically unbounded forum for critical examination of the roles images have played in shaping both the past and the present.

**We additionally welcome submissions from artists whose work encompasses similar themes and concerns.

Proposals for individual papers (20 minutes maximum) should be no more than 400 words in length and may be sent by email, with a current graduate level CV to buctb2013@gmail.com (Attn: Proposal). Those wishing to submit hard copies of the proposal and CV should forward them to: Art History (Attn: Crossing the Boundaries), Binghamton University, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000. We also welcome proposals for integrated panels. Panel organizers should describe the theme of the panel and send abstracts with names and affiliations of all participants along with current CVs. A panel should consist of no more than three papers, each twenty minutes in length. Deadline for submissions is February 1, 2013.

cfp categories:
african-american
american
classical_studies
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
general_announcements
graduate_conferences
humanities_computing_and_the_internet
interdisciplinary
medieval
modernist studies
popular_culture
postcolonial
renaissance
science_and_culture
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond
And of course, don’t forget our own graduate conference as well! Here’s the link to the post on the CFP for St. John’s graduate conference. Visit our Call for Papers section for other conferences as well.
About Steve Mentz 617 Articles

I teach Shakespeare and early modern literature at St. John’s in New York City.

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